How to Fit Track Spotlights

Introduction

Track lighting systems can transform a dull room into a new environment. Ceiling fixings are supplied by the manufacturers of track systems. Remember, though, that the number of lights on the track must not overload the lighting circuit: all the lights on the circuit must not exceed 1200 watts – that’s only twelve 100-watt light bulbs on the whole circuit. Make sure that your circuit can carry the load.

Step by Step Instructions

1 Switch off the mains power

Identify the lighting circuit you will be working on, switch off the main power at the consumer unit and remove the fuse for the circuit. Unscrew the ceiling rose cover and let it slide down the flex of the pendant light. Disconnect the light flex from the rose to free the lamp.

2 Track lighting system

Track manufacturers supply the appropriate fixings to attach the track to the ceiling. At one end of the track will be a terminal block housing into which the cables from the ceiling rose are wired. There will also be an ‘end stop’ for the track, which must be fitted.

3 Mount the track

Position the track on the ceiling: the terminal housing block should be situated where the old ceiling rose was located. Mark the position of the track fixings on the ceiling and then fix the track securely to the ceiling.

4 Connect the cables

Pass the current cables from the ceiling rose into the fitting of the track lighting system and wire it to the cable connector inside the housing. If the circuit you are working on is a loop-in system, mount a junction box in the ceiling void to connect the cables.

5 Attach the lights

Slide or clip the individual lights to the track. It should have an ‘end stop’ to prevent the lights coming off the track and to contain the current within the track. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Replace the circuit fuse and return the power to test the lights.

Don’t simply switch off the light at the wall switch. Always turn off the main power at the consumer unit and remove the lighting circuit fuse before you start working on the wiring.

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